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Posts Tagged ‘Department of Water Resources’

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A view of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has produced a video called Restoring California’s Great Estuary that explains the EcoRestore initiative which is one of the big, state-wide efforts that is aiming at restoring some fairly significant amounts of habitat to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

Being that I work for a State agency called the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conservancy, this is something that I pay a lot of attention to. But there are a lot of reasons that everyone who lives in California, and many people who live outside the state, should also be interested in this video. A large portion of the people, farms, ranches, and industries in California rely, at least in part, on water from the Delta. That fact alone should make efforts like

Also, I work with many of the people featured in this video including my boss, Campbell Ingram. Seeing talented people that I know talking about an issue that I care about makes this video that much more appealing to me, but that probably won’t have much impact on you.

Enjoy!

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I have been working for the California Department of Water Resources for a couple of months now. It has been a really cool experience in many ways, and I thought that sharing some of those experiences would be fun. So, here are a bunch of photos from my first two months on the job. The job, in this case, is focused on a place called the Clifton Court Forebay in eastern Contra Costa County. This is one of the main points where water is collected and then pumped from the Forebay into the California Aqueduct for transport to southern California. One of the major problems with this pumping system is that it is so powerful it pulls lots of fish into the Forebay including several species of threatened or endangered species such as Chinook Salmon, Steelhead, and Green Sturgeon. In response to this puling in of high numbers of fish, high numbers of predators also concentrate around the Forebay. These predators include predatory fish such as Stripped Bass, Large-mouth Bass, and several species of catfish. Other predators are many species of piscivorous birds such as herons, egrets, pelicans, grebes, terns, etc. The main point of the project I am working on is to find ways of reducing the numbers of predators in and around the Forebay. To do this, we are trying to figure out how and where the predators most commonly access the Forebay. This includes frequent avian surveys around the Forebay and also tracking the movement of the predatory fish. This tracking is accomplished by capturing fish and preforming surgeries on them to implant PIT tags and/or acoustic tags in them. These tags emit sound at particular frequencies and in particular patterns. Each tag has a unique combination of frequency and pattern which allows each tag to be individually identifiable. Microphones are setup around the Forebay and in the canals that connect to the Forebay so that as fish swim around, their tags are picked up and their locations recorded. In this way, we can track fish movement to a pretty fine level of detail. Pretty cool!

So, with that background, here is what my job actually looks like (all photos are my own unless otherwise noted).

IMG_2813The front doors of my building.

This is the Resources Building in downtown Sac.

My little corner.

IMG_2814Sunrise over the yard where we keep our trucks and boats.

IMG_2814aThis is me with my first Stripped Bass. It is just a small one, but still big enough to tag! (Photo courtesy of Mike Cane).

A view of the edge of the Forebay.

IMG_2817Osprey.

IMG_2818Bald Eagle.

IMG_2825The portion of the Forebay that leads into the pumps.

IMG_2826Tule beds in a corner of the Forebay.

IMG_2827A view across the Forebay.

IMG_2828One of the canals that leads into the Forebay.

IMG_2829The east slope of Mount Diablo in the distance.

IMG_2835Can you see the bird?

IMG_2837There it is! This is a Snowy Plover that I found on the edge of the Forebay. I was pretty excited to find this federally threatened species, especially since this was decidedly outside its normal habitat and range.

IMG_2842Here is another photo of the same HY Snowy Plover.

IMG_2844A flock of Long-billed Curlews and WIllets hanging out on the edge of the Forebay.

IMG_2845Long-billed Curlew.

IMG_2851Long-billed Curlew in flight.

IMG_2854I found this Red-shouldered Hawk on the bank of the Sacramento River as I walked to work one morning. It is sitting on a California Groundsquirrel.

IMG_2859Piscivorous birds lined up on one of the wing walls in the Forebay.

IMG_2860There are obviously a lot of fish to be had.

IMG_2863Pied-billed Grebe nesting in the floating vegetation that grows in the Forebay.

IMG_2864Clark’s and Western Grebes nesting on the Forebay.

IMG_2869This large fly (about 2-3 cm long) landed on the truck. Any ideas as to an ID?

IMG_2871Another view of Mount Diablo.

IMG_2873Me conducting an avian survey (Photo courtesy of Michelle Tyson).

IMG_2877Caspian Tern, Snowy Egret, and California Gulls.

IMG_2879American White Pelicans feeding in the Forebay.

IMG_2882One American White Pelican swam quite close to us as we were counting.

IMG_2883Clark’s and Western Grebes nesting in a patch of floating vegetation.

IMG_2884A closer look at the Clark’s and Western Grebe nesting colony.

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